Geoffrey Robertson QC

Geoffrey Robertson QC is a leading human rights lawyer. He has been a UN war-crimes judge, a counsel in many notable Old Bailey trials, has defended hundreds of men facing death sentences in the Caribbean, and has won landmark rulings on civil liberty from the highest courts in Britain, Europe and the Commonwealth. 
 
He is founder and Head of Doughty Street Chambers, a Master of the Middle Temple, a Recorder and visiting professor at Queen Mary College, University of London. He has had a distinguished career as a trial counsel and human rights advocate; has handled hundreds of death sentence appeals; prosecuted Hastings Banda and defended Salman Rushdie; and acted for terrorist suspects at the Old Bailey and for Human Rights Watch in the proceedings against General Pinochet. He was counsel to the Antiguan Royal Commission which exposed arms traffic to the Medellin drugs cartel and was involved in training the judges to try Saddam Hussein. He served as an appeal judge for the UN war crimes court in Sierra Leone and has authored landmark decisions on the limits of amnesties, the illegality of recruiting child soldiers and other critical issues in the development of international criminal law.
 
His book Crimes Against Humanity has been an inspiration for the global justice movement, his other books include Freedom, the Individual and the Law; Does Dracula Have AIDS?; Media Law; and the acclaimed memoir, The Justice Game. In 2005 he published The Tyrannicide Brief – the story of how Cromwell’s lawyers mounted the first trial of a head of state. He has made many television and radio programmes, notably Geoffrey Robertson’s Hypotheticals, and has won a Freedom of Information award for his writing and broadcasting. He lives in London.